The Southwark Mysteries


This is a very interesting book about the spirit of Southwark called The Goose who has dictated various rhymes and prose to John Constable.

The Goose is the spirit of a prostitute; this spirit was disturbed when The Crossbones Cemetery in Southwark, London was also disturbed during the extension of the Jubilee line of the London Underground in 1996 and seems to be trying to become a goddess.

Vigils are done at the Crossbones Graveyard on the 23rd of each month and offerings of keys and flowers are left at the gates. Her mystery plays have been performed at Southwark Cathedral and if she has enough followers in my opinion she will become a goddess.

Anyone who is interested in following a modern English goddess should read this book. I found it interesting, but I have already been claimed.

The Auraceipt na-Eces – The Scholar’s Primer ed George Calder


While I enjoyed reading the Auraceipt I often found it confusing, because most of it is to do with the word structure of Irish Gaelige and I only know one or two words. I suspect that if I knew gaelige I would find it invaluable.

The section on Ogham is very illuminating and gives insight into the system, although more study is required of the meanings given in the book. I suspect that some of them e.g. ash=weaving can be expanded into the tasks a weaver did, which would be well-known at the time the book was written, but not now.

This book has highlighted the need for me to look into the language that I use in spells; how a word is made up and all the meanings of it. I found that it’s one of these books that you do not immediately get much use of it, but has far-reaching impacts in your practice.

Celtic Lore and Spellcraft of the Dark Goddess by Stephanie Woodfield


I was recommended this book but it turned out to be one of those books full of spells and prayers.

The first few chapters have mythology about The Morrigan. Woodfield has answered the question of who makes up the Morrigu triplet as the texts give several different members of the triplicity, but does not say how she comes to her answer.

I gave up on the book when it mentioned Badb’s cauldron. I’ve checked Sacred Texts and none of its texts mention her having a cauldron. Granted, this could be some folklore reference I haven’t heard of, but since the writer is not giving references for that particular fact it’s probably unverifiable personal gnosis.

In other words; this is another book so people don’t have to do the actual work of reading the texts and making spells and prayers of their own which would work better.

The Druids by T. D. Kendrick


This is an informative and easy to read book which is good for someone who has not read a lot about druids, like myself.

The author wrote the book so he would be able to come to a conclusion about their origin. Unfortunately he concludes that he cannot do so, but it is still a good book with a lot of basic information about the druids and one I would recommend.

Anyone who has read a lot about the druids would be advised to give this book a miss as they are unlikely to learn anything new.

Pagan Portals – Hedge Riding by Harmonia Saille


I was disappointed in this book as I expected it to be all about hedge riding. It turned out to be another paganism 101 book with a little bit about hedge riding. It would make a decent first book for a beginning pagan, but not for anyone interested in hedge riding.

It does have one or two things I vehemently disagree with, but it doesn’t make any huge mistakes nor is it preachy. It covers the basics and would be a good lead into other things.

Irish Traditional Witchcraft by Steve Blamires


This book outlines meditations for Irish witches which are based on the four treasures of the Tuatha De Danaan.

Steve has obviously done his homework, but I can’t use his system as it’s based on four treasures and I’ve spent years using triplicities and sacred numbers. Somehow the Irish sacred numbers do not include the number four and I do not know yet what part the treasures play in my practice.

It is a good book that I would recommend to a beginner, but it’s not for me.

Irish Folk Cures by Padraic O’Farrell


This is an interesting little book filled with folk cures that have been passed on to the author. However, it is of mainly historical interest, as the cures have in them ingredients that we now know to be harmful.

If you’re interested in historical cures then get this book, otherwise look for a more up-to-date folk cure book.

Irish Early Law by Fergus Kelly


This is a very good book which is well-written and easy to read. It details the law in Ireland in the Dark Ages and is a fascinating look at the Irish culture that would have been around when the myths were being written down.

Despite what feminists would have us believe, while Irish women had more rights than their continental counterparts, they still did not have it easy.

This book shows that women could only learn professions (such as Druidry) if there were no men in the family left to carry on the family profession. Also, women belonged to the father when they were young, to the husband when they were married and to the family if they were widowed.

This book was expensive at £40, but it was well worth paying the money for it.

Irish Early Law by Fergus Kelly


This is a very good book which is well-written and easy to read. It details the law in Ireland in the Dark Ages and is a fascinating look at the Irish culture that would have been around when the myths were being written down.

Despite what feminists would have us believe, while Irish women had more rights than their continental counterparts, they still did not have it easy.

This book shows that women could only learn professions (such as Druidry) if there were no men in the family left to carry on the family profession. Also, women belonged to the father when they were young, to the husband when they were married and to the family if they were widowed.

This book was expensive at £40, but it was well worth paying the money for it.

Ancient Legends and Superstitions of Ireland by Lady Wilde


This book is a must for anyone who wants to read about charms, omens and superstitions of Ireland.

The book starts off with stories. Each batch of stories is interspersed with sections on various superstitions of Irish life. Interestingly one of the first stories is about the SATOR square used in Ceremonial magic.

There is a section about charms and spells, a section about plants and one about omens, so this book is really useful to anyone following an Irish path.

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